Ubiquity Lab

Social media advocacy: More than a quarter of million dollars value in three months

AustralianSuper Aidan Cunningham case study testimonial quote

Working with Matt and ULab has stimulated great change at AustralianSuper. We wanted to democratise the use of social media to allow the organisation to demonstrate its character and capability, through our people.

We needed a strategy that would empower and encourage our colleagues to be brave on social media. The structures and execution of the plan meant we felt comfortable that the brand’s reputation was in safe hands.

 

The work that ULab and AustralianSuper have done together will have lasting benefits for the fund and its people.

AustralianSuper Logo

Aidan Cunningham

AustralianSuper Social Media Lead

AustralianSuper is the country’s biggest and most trusted superannuation fund – one in 10 working Australians are with them.

 

It needed a strategy to empower it’s people to share stories, successes and standpoints – to ensure its social media presence was as prolific as the fund.

The TL;DR snapshot:

The challenge: How to empower your biggest advocates

AustralianSuper’s people are one of its most significant assets, and the strongest advocates for the brand. But they were largely dormant on social media, thanks in part to an outdated policy.

 

The fund knew it needed to build an internal social advocacy program to increase trust, showcase its expertise, and deepen relationships with existing and potential members.

Our approach: Build a clear, scalable roadmap and secure buy-in

First, we had to build a strategy that clearly articulated the commercial benefits of a social media advocacy program.

 

The Brand team knew its policies were outdated, but we had to demonstrate the commercial benefits of a new approach – as well as how we were going to mitigate reputational risk.

The strategy focussed on three core elements:
Ubiquity Lab worked with AustralianSuper for employee engagement

We also developed four engagement pillars – guardrails – that mapped back to the brand and reputation strategy, so our pilot ‘social champions’ felt confident around what they should talk about.

 

From there, we socialised the plan of attack with key executives, as well as a myriad of teams, including marketing, compliance, internal comms, corporate affairs, and customer service.

The solution: Activate an army of internal social advocates

We undertook a 3-month pilot with a diverse group of 15 internal champions – different teams, ages, sexes and seniority levels.

 

Their challenge was to update their LinkedIn profiles, become more socially active and to publish articles to LinkedIn.

 

To kick things off, we ran a workshop with the champions to supercharge their understanding of social media best practice and to educate them on how to enhance their personal brand.

 

Subsequently, we produced a raft of training collateral and videos to help embed the workshop learnings.

 

Additionally, we had a journalist on hand to edit articles the champions wanted to publish to LinkedIn, given a lot of them didn’t feel confident in their writing.

 

In unison, we recruited Rose Kerlin, Group Executive Membership – a member of the exec team – to participate and we worked with her and corporate affairs to identify key thought leadership platforms she could speak authentically about.

 

Importantly, this ensured top-down and bottom-up buy-in.

Rose Kerlin AustralianSuper Linkedin Post to increase employee advocacy and engagement

The results: A cultural change and more than $277,000 value in three months

To say the pilot outperformed all expectations is accurate – but it’s also doesn’t do the results justice.

Most importantly, the pilot drove cultural change at AustralianSuper. Social advocacy is now embedded in the fund.

Specifically, the project: